Brett Hurt

Hurt Family Investments; Co-founder and Vice Chair, Bazaarvoice; Chair, Compare Metrics; Founder, Coremetrics

Aug 10, 2014

The founding of the UT Discovery Fund

When I was an undergrad student at the University of Texas at Austin I very much wanted to become an entrepreneur. During those years (1990-1994), however, there was almost no support for entrepreneurship at the University. I didn't feel "developed" enough to pursue my dream, so I decided to go into consulting instead and became an entrepreneur a few years later, while I was earning my MBA.

In September 2013, I began my tenure as Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the University of Texas at Austin. I was proud to follow in the footsteps of my grandfather, who taught at UT Austin his entire career. Instead of imposing what I thought the community would be need during my time as EIR, I took a lesson from building Bazaarvoice and Coremetrics. I created a team of four very influential and entrepreneurial student leaders and asked, “What does the student entrepreneur community need?”. The four were Taylor Barnett, Verick Cornett, Dan Driscoll, and Jonathan Van. We became the “Office of the EIR”. Nick Spiller joined our team later and right after graduation he joined UT to continue the charge as an entrepreneurial catalyst across the school.

This approach was very effective - the students, after all, were my customers and who better to tell me what the customer needed than the customer themself. Two core problems came up frequently during our first meetings. The community was hungry for mentorship, which we did our best to solve by setting up weekly EIR and guest EIR office hours, and a need for seed funding, which is why we started working on the UT Discovery Fund.

Our team had peers at the Dorm Room Fund and Rough Draft Ventures, so we knew it was possible to have a student run fund benefiting student run ventures. We wanted a peer-to-peer capital source, with student leaders from across campus working together and funding starters, builders, and makers on the Forty Acres.

In my recent Lucky7 post, the new Golden Age of Tech, I wrote:

Today, most people — anywhere in the world and with purchasing power — are online… and online is portable. We all have a supercomputer in our pockets (and a rare few of us wear them on their faces — me not being one of those). Your ability to reach the world market has never been greater or more efficient. The price and speed at which you can launch a new business because of cloud services like Amazon’s Web Services or Google’s Cloud Platform has never been lower or faster, respectively. The price to experiment — and potentially create something valuable that the world needs now — has never been lower (both in terms of time and money).

Data shows the global youth are increasingly more entrepreneurial — both out of necessity as well as benefiting from all of those that came before them (and the access to those lessons in today's age of the networked "global village"). While the costs of experimenting have gone down, they aren’t nonexistent, and with most students taking out five-figure loans to pay for school, finding and obtaining the additional capital to start your company is often extremely difficult. As my good friend and one of our initial investors at Bazaarvoice, Josh Kopelman, said, "Just because it takes less capital to build a company now, doesn’t mean it doesn’t take any.”

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Jul 12, 2014

Who this new generation of aspiring entrepreneurs are and the new Golden Age of tech (part 2 of 3)

This is part two of a three-part series on entrepreneurship. The parts:

  1. 'Is it too late for me to start my own business?', and other sheepish questions (Lucky7 post)
  2. Who this new generation of aspiring entrepreneurs are and the new Golden Age of tech
  3. How I define the soul of entrepreneurs: you change the world

Part Two

We live in very interesting times. It's 2010 and I'm at a family reunion. We've just barely survived the most cataclysmic global financial crisis in the modern history and one of my cousins asks me, "How can tech be doing so well while the rest of the economy is doing so poorly?". I did my best to answer but the question kept eating at me. I remembered Michael Porter's Harvard Business Review article about the Internet being the sixth force - and how it would disrupt all of the previous five forces cited in his famous strategic model.

Fast forward just four years later and a five-year old company, WhatsApp, is bought for $19 billion by Facebook, a company that itself is only ten-years old at the time but worth a mighty $170 billion. Just two years earlier, when Facebook went public, the media was asking for Morgan Stanley's head - and sometimes Mark Zuckerberg's or David Ebersman's (CFO of Facebook) head - for what was perceived at that time as an overpriced IPO. Except that it wasn't... and any investors that held on to their IPO stock should now be very happy campers.

When five and ten-year old companies are valued at $19 billion and $170 billion, respectively, sometimes I hear the "bubble" word. This is a word that has very personal meaning to me. I lived through the ultimate "bubble" popping when I lived in San Francisco from 2000-2003. I remember going to Starbucks and the barista lamenting that they used to be one of the heads of marketing at Pets.com (remember the sock puppet?). I remember how one person I knew, Tony Perkins (the founder of the VC blogging network AlwaysOn), called the ball in his book The Internet Bubble in November of 1999. Almost no one believed him at the time, and then - WHAM - it happened. It was very painful. I had to let 70% of our people go at Coremetrics while our dot-com client base very rapidly dwindled from 100 clients to 2. We survived... barely... to fortunately thrive later.

But today I believe we are in the opposite of a bubble - I believe are in the new Golden Age of tech. While it always makes one nervous to make a forecast like this, I think the years ahead will be some of the best ever for tech entrepreneurs. And I've been putting our money where our mouth is on this with Hurt Family Investments and our growing portfolio.

To understand why, first you have to understand what is happening with exponential, digital, and combinatorial technologies. The book review I wrote on The Second Machine Age explains this - and the book itself is a must-read on this topic. We live in an unprecedented time and everything is speeding up - and not just with Internet technologies. When I was a kid I would tell my elementary school teachers that computers would transform all industries. That as they speed up, all industries would change more quickly. I was too young to use words like "disruption" but that is exactly what would happen - at an accelerating pace. Whether it is the "Internet of things", smart-phone and tablet adoption, the social revolution, 3D printing (including food and organs), personalized medicine, nanotechnology, artificial intelligence and machine learning, or any number of fields computers are rapidly changing, it is happening... everywhere.

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Jun 28, 2014

'Is it too late for me to start my own business?', and other sheepish questions (part 1 of 3)

This is part one of a three-part series on entrepreneurship. The parts:

  1. 'Is it too late for me to start my own business?', and other sheepish questions
  2. Who this new generation of aspiring entrepreneurs are and the new Golden Age of tech
  3. How I define the soul of entrepreneurs: you change the world

Part One

It's March of 2013 and I'm at Wharton serving as an Entrepreneur-in-Residence when I get a question that baffles me. I'm speaking at the Penn Founders' Club, where all University of Pennsylvania students are welcome as long as they are fervently working on a real business while they are in school. I've just wrapped up my opening comments and it is time for Q&A. The baffling question: "Have all of the really big ideas already been thought of?". I couldn't believe it when I could see the student was being serious and not just pulling my leg, and I was fired up. I passionately describe how the world always needs entrepreneurs to drive it forward, and there are always ideas - everywhere - if you just look hard to find them. I talk about how I just read the book Abundance, wrote the longest book review of my life on it at Lucky7, and there are thousands of great ideas in the book for entrepreneurs to solve the world's biggest problems. A few months later, Waze gets bought for $966 million by Google. A few months after that, Snapchat gets a rumored $3 billion offer from Facebook, which I wrote about in this Lucky7 post on valuations. And then almost a year after receiving that question at Penn, WhatsApp gets a firm acquisition offer of $19 billion from Facebook, one month after Google buys Nest for $3.2 billion.

Fast forward to a month ago and I see a question on Quora that catches my eye - Life: I am 35 and I have not achieved much in life. Is it too late?. The top two answers out of 176 and counting have a combined 4,900 "upvotes". I especially found this graphic compelling:

Too Late to Start

And then you have the Values.com billboards, of which this one caught my eye years ago. Henry Ford failed miserably with his first startup, the Detroit Automobile Company, which he started at age 36 but then... at the age of 38 he founded his second venture...:

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Jun 23, 2014

A quick review of 'The Second Machine Age'

Last year, I recommended Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think as my book pick of the year and wrote an abundantly long review of it. There are thousands of good business ideas in that book for entrepreneurs that are destined to change the world (I also wrote about Elon Musk being my current pick as entrepreneur-of-the-decade as he defines the ethos of this mindset better than anyone I can think of in today's age).

This year, I'm recommending you read The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies as a compliment to Abundance. To choose a word from the title, this is a brilliant book. It is written by two MIT professors that I am fortunate enough to call friends, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee.

Second Machine Age

Like Abundance, the book walks you through our current age and is quite optimistic about what technologies the future will bring. It defines the second machine age (with the first being the Industrial Revolution) as an age defined by exponential, digital, and combinatorial technologies. With exponential, think Moore's Law. With digital, think about prices becoming lower and lower with no degrading of quality. And with combinatorial, think of Facebook and how it brilliantly combined several technologies that were products of the first two traits - digital and exponential - into something new and very valuable, very quickly (because we are all networked together like never before, thanks to the Internet, and therefore new digital technologies can take off very, very quickly).

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Jun 17, 2014

The impact that just one teacher can have on you

I had a very special experience in the last few weeks of my time as Entrepreneur-in-Residence at McCombs. I reconnected with Rick Byars, who was my MIS333K professor (my undergraduate major at the University of Texas at Austin was MIS), in time for his legendary end-of-semester speech. He invited me to attend and speak for five minutes at the end of it.

To put this in context, when I was in Rick's class back in 1994 it had a huge impact on me. First of all, it was the most practical class I took at U.T. and, as a result, the one I remember the best. It simulates what it is like to be a technology consultant by giving you and your small team a large project to develop, test, and "deploy" by the end of the semester. It is the most time consuming class I took at U.T., by far, but at the end of it you have an incredible feeling of accomplishment. And then, at the end of the semester, Rick surprises you with the article below and his talk about it. You had no idea it was coming, and the shock value is what makes it a very special experience. You can't help but thinking, "Is this for real?! Was this really Rick?".

Rick Byars article

Rick's big point is that the journey of life is the reward. And it doesn't have to be scripted by your parents, your boss, society, or anyone else. It is your journey and yours alone. It doesn't have to be a straight line. It is your line. There doesn't have to be a "logical" progression. It is your progression in the journey.

I remembered this talk when I was at Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group, who I joined right after I graduated from U.T. Austin. While I can say some good things about my experience working there for two years, I can also tell you that I felt "maxed out" after a year. I was, frankly, bored. And I was frustrated that I had not followed my dream to start a business upon graduation. I didn't feel ready and I underestimated my ability to "learn the ropes" quickly as I went. It also bothered me that Deloitte was charging our clients around 10x more per hour than they were paying me. I believed that I could do this work on my own and probably charge a similar hourly rate to theirs, and I needed to prove that to myself. I was looking for a way out - I, in short, felt somewhat like Rick did at IBM. Thankfully, at Deloitte, they would pay for some promising people's MBA education if they returned post graduation. I saw the path and I convinced Deloitte that I could be one of those people. Deloitte gave me the opportunity to test my mettle. I was accepted to Wharton, and I began my first business - consulting - at the end of my first semester. I cleared around $250-$350/hour per project, and I felt more career freedom than ever before. There was no going back (you can read about my journey in my first few businesses in this Lucky7 post) - I was now solidly on the entrepreneurial path. Rick's class prepared me for Deloitte, which in turn prepared me to launch my own consulting business. As I would tell U.T. Austin students that would visit me during EIR office hours, this is a great way to prove to yourself that you can be an entrepreneur. Do the job that you did for an employer on your own, as a consultant, to start the entrepreneurial journey in a lower-risk way (it has limited upside, though, as I wrote about in my state of tech entrepreneurship in Austin post).

After starting five businesses and being the entrepreneur myself, I'm on a different journey now. One where I'm dedicated to helping others achieve their goals. You can see our emerging portfolio, and we're very thankful to the entrepreneurs that allow us to invest and hopefully help them along in their journey.

What teacher has had an impact like that on your life? I'm sure you can name one. Please tell us all about them in the comments section below.

For more on the journey being the reward, I have some simple advice for you in this Lucky7 post. Entrepreneur CEOs - this advice will especially help you.

A final word: Thank you, Rick, for your incredible dedication at McCombs. You made a big impact on me, and it was a sincere pleasure to be in one of your last classes in your 34-year history (so far) there. Seeing your talk 20 years after I was a student in your class was, to say the least, a very reflective experience. I can also tell you that your talk was one of my inspirations when I wrote this Lucky7 post on what Benjamin Franklin may have meant when he famously said, "remember that time is money".

May 19, 2014

Learnings from four entrepreneurs I interviewed this past semester - Michael Dell, Rod Canion, Matt Chasen, and Dan Graham

I joined the McCombs Business School at the University of Texas at Austin as Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the beginning of the 2013-2014 academic year. Yesterday marked my last day in this role. I kicked it off with a speech to the entering MBA class about the top-ten lessons I wished someone had taught me when I was beginning my MBA. I loved serving the University and it's students in this capacity. The entrepreneurial energy on campus is really fantastic and very encouraging for the future of both Austin and our nation at large. There is no doubt a huge trend towards entrepreneurship at most top-ranked universities and U.T. Austin is leading the way in one of the most entrepreneurial cities and states in our nation. Consider that Texas has created 70% of the new jobs in the U.S. since 2005, as reported by BBVA Compass, and you start to tune in a bit more into what is happening here. Compared to when I attended U.T. Austin from 1990-1994, where entrepreneurship was hard to find, every major college at U.T. now has its own entrepreneurial club and initiatives. In my Office Hours, I met with hundreds of students who have either launched their own business while at the University or they are actively planning on doing that at some early point in their career (I didn't become an entrepreneur myself until I was 24 and beginning my MBA, so I tell them I was a "late bloomer").

As part of my EIR post, I continued the Speaker Series that Laura Kilcrease began as my predecessor. To that end, I interviewed seven entrepreneurs and one VC during my time in this role. All of these interviews are recorded, and I should thank the Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship for the funding to do this and promote entrepreneurship all over U.T. Austin.

You can watch the previous semester's interviews in this Lucky7 post, which include Cotter Cunningham (RetailMeNot), John Arrow (Mutual Mobile), Chris Pacitti (Austin Ventures), and Josh Baer (Capital Factory and Longhorn Startup).

For this semester, I started it off with a bang at SXSW with my interviews of Michael Dell and Rod Canion, the founder and first CEO of Compaq. These interviews were a great contrast to each other. Michael started Dell while attending U.T. Austin as everyone knows. His sales took off at an astronomical pace and he decided to drop out as a result. I've used him as an example for students who have visited me during Office Hours and are considering dropping out. It is a trade of sorts - the completion of the degree or the immediate pursuit of the market opportunity. If you are a student and have sales like Michael Dell did at the beginning of Dell, I think it is a rather easy decision. But most of the students that I speak with about this are considering dropping out with very little revenue. Of course, Mark Zuckerberg dropped out with no revenue, but I think that is different as we discussed in the Lucky7 post about Snapchat's $3 billion (at the time) valuation (written before the incredible bet by Facebook on acquiring WhatsApp for $19 billion). Marc had Google's experience to point to - with that astronomical rise in Facebook users, the advertising revenue was sure to come at one point. We cover a lot of topics in this SXSW interview, including trends in the IT industry, why Austin, and what Michael and Susan are focused on philanthropically. Thanks to Josh Baer, founder of Capital Factory, for securing the space at the Omni Hotel - we made this a Capital Factory, SXSW, and U.T. Austin promoted event as a result.

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Feb 21, 2014

A call to action for CEOs: You must sell

There is no more effective selling tool in a company’s organization than the company’s CEO. However, this tool is not used nearly as often or effectively as it should be. And that is because of the CEO themselves.

CEOs must adopt the regular practice of selflessly serving the rest of the organization. They must realize that their selling megaphone is larger than any other. This is not because they are better than anyone else in the organization. Everyone in the organization is just playing their role to their best ability. It is because the CEO possesses the company’s highest executive title, and the title signals several important distinctions:

  1. The CEO is the synthesis point for the entire organization. No other role can set the priorities and direction for the entire company as effectively because no other role is tasked with the management of the entire organization. Every other role, such as the head of engineering, is functionally focused.
  2. Hierarchy is learned from the very beginning of business education. As a result, everyone is trained on the CEO being the most powerful person in the organization. The CEO is the only one that can hire, fire, and promote the executive team, and these responsibilities set the culture and performance for the entire organization.
  3. If the CEO is also a founder of the business, then they embody the American dream. In the Lucky7 post on the similarity of the DNA of 1776, Steve Jobs, and Israel (see links below for further reading), the point is made that there is an entrepreneur in all of us - and therefore a call to action for all of us to help those brave souls.

It took me awhile to realize the importance of selling as a CEO. At the start of my founder/CEO career, what got me to that initial milestone were the technical skills I had developed, thanks to my mother allowing me to focus on my calling in life from the age of 7. As a result, I felt very comfortable programming. I was in the flow of it. But I hadn’t developed presentation skills. I didn’t know how to sell. However, I was lucky enough to be authentically living my calling, and that is the most effective sales tool of all. It is the most effective because anyone you are trying to sell to will feel your energy, your authenticity. It provides the best foundation in which to build selling skills. And you have to learn selling skills just like any other. Practicing, doing, reflecting, refining. Because developing a new skill is difficult, some CEOs shy away from it and therefore make an excuse for themselves not engaging in selling. These excuses range from:

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Jan 1, 2014

Learnings from three entrepreneurs and one VC I interviewed this past semester

I joined the McCombs Business School at the University of Texas at Austin as Entrepreneur-in-Residence this past semester. I kicked it off with a speech to the entering MBA class about the top-ten lessons I wished someone had taught me when I was beginning my MBA. I have very much enjoyed my first semester in this capacity and the entrepreneurial energy on campus is really fantastic. There is no doubt a huge trend towards entrepreneurship at most top-ranked universities and U.T. Austin is leading the way in one of the most entrepreneurial cities and states in our nation. Consider that Texas has created 70% of the new jobs in the U.S. since 2005, as reported by BBVA Compass, and you start to tune in a bit more into what is happening here. Compared to when I attended U.T. Austin from 1990-1994, where entrepreneurship was hard to find, every major college at U.T. now has its own entrepreneurial club and initiatives. In my Office Hours, I have met with over a hundred students who have either launched their own business while at the University or they are actively planning on doing that at some early point in their career (I didn't become an entrepreneur myself until I was 24 and beginning my MBA, so I tell them I was a "late bloomer").

As part of my EIR post, I have continued the Speaker Series that Laura Kilcrease began as my predecessor. To that end, I interviewed three entrepreneurs and one VC that I think you would be interested in learning from as we begin 2014. All of these interviews are recorded, and I should thank the Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship for the funding to do this and promote entrepreneurship all over U.T. Austin.

The first was Josh Baer, founder of Capital Factory, which has become a huge entrepreneurial force for Austin as our largest tech incubator. Among other accomplishments for Capital Factory this year - which are many - Josh Baer coordinated a visit by President Obama and US CTO Todd Park to kick off their "Jobs & Opportunity Tour" (I wrote about this milestone for Austin in this Lucky7 post). Josh's main message in our interview was how important it is for serious student entrepreneurs to get started now, while they have no financial encumberences and so many resources available to them at U.T. He gives a lot of tips on how to do so. You can also learn a lot from his own entrepreneurial experience, which we talk about extensively in the interview.

The second was Cotter Cunningham, who led RetailMeNot to Austin's most successful IPO and follow-on offering of 2013. As of this writing, RetailMeNot is worth close to $1.5 billion and it is only four years old. Unlike the romantic notions that most have of entrepreneurs being young and college dropouts, Cotter Cunningham is the opposite of that. He didn't start his first business until he was 46-years old, and it failed, and then he quickly pivoted to found RetailMeNot, with the help of Austin Ventures, and the rest is history. In our interview, he talks about how his extensive operational experience gave him a big edge. He also speaks about company culture and staying humble.

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Dec 31, 2013

What I learned from my top three Lucky7 posts in 2013 … and my biggest busts

December 5th marked my first year of blogging personally (I had previously been a corporate blogger for 7 years at Bazaarvoice). I began blogging primarily as a service to entrepreneurs - a form of giving back to the community that I believe is the greatest force for change. I named my blog Lucky7 as a tribute to my amazing mother, who passed away last year. My first Lucky7 post on December 5, 2012 was a revisit of my manifesto to Bootstrap Austin on March 15, 2005. Looking back, it was clear I deeply cared about the development of our entrepreneurial community in Austin. That caring - and passion - drove a year of many highs in 2013. I've been actively investing in startups since December of last year with my wife, Debra, and I formally chose this as a career a few months ago, forming Hurt Family Investments. We've made 14 startup investments so far, 9 of them Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) companies. I've also joined the Advisory Board of 6 additional companies, all of them SaaS. Out of the 20 startups we are involved in, 16 are headquartered in Austin.

Looking back on my most popular Lucky7 posts of 2013 - as measured by how many comments they received (the blog is, after all, named Lucky7.io - the .io stands for input and output) - some trends emerge that I believe are useful to share.

The top-rated post of 2013 was "Listening to your soul". This was my biggest news of 2013 but it also reinforces to me how important authenticity is. We all strive to interact with people - and people include brands and other forms of "tribes" - who are authentic... and to be authentic ourselves. I'm seeing book after book written about authenticity in marketing, leadership, craft, and other topics, and I'm proud that Bazaarvoice has taken up this mantle too with our recent authenticity announcements.

The runner-up was my rant on derogatory language in business. Coincidence that this rant also relates to authenticity - treating people with dignity? This post - and the actions that I took at Bazaarvoice and implored other entrepreneurs and leaders to take - is directly related to the Golden Rule: "One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself".

And the second runner-up was one of my longest posts, at almost 4,000 words, "The state of tech entrepreneurship in Austin". It was not surprising to me that this would be a popular post as Austin's entrepreneurial journey needed this level of documentation - a sort of benchmark to rally around. I defined three stages of entrepreneurship and related my Austin entrepreneurial experience to my formative four years in Silicon Valley, from 2000-2003, during the height of the dot-com boom through the bust, 9/11, and the eventual rebuild. It is a post I plan to revisit every year to document how Austin has evolved, and I very much believe the next 10 years are going to be our best yet. Since writing that post in April, we've had many milestones that I've also documented, including President Obama and CTO Todd Park's visit Capital Factory (making Austin their first stop on the "Jobs & Opportunity Tour"), the well-known incubator TechStars launching here, and the blockbuster IPO and follow-on offering of hometown hero RetailMeNot.

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Dec 7, 2013

At age 46, he started his first company and it failed miserably… but then, on his second…!

For all of us Austin fans, I'm talking about Cotter Cunningham, the founder and CEO of RetailMeNot. Last night, Cotter was one of our keynote speakers, along with Mark Cuban, at the University of Texas for Longhorn Startup Demo Day (the event was just fantastic, by the way, and Josh Baer, Ben Dyer, and Bob Metcalfe deserve a huge round of applause for it).

As of today, RetailMeNot is worth $1.33 billion as a public company (it went public in July and just filed for a follow-on offering). It is just four years old - for a value creation of $333 million per year. Who says Austin can't do B2C now? HomeAway is another one of our five tech IPOs in the last five years. It is worth $3.4 billion today as a public company (it went public in 2011). It is just nine years old. Yes, we haven't produced a Facebook or Twitter size outcome - there needs to be a higher volume of failures (entrepreneurial experiements) to do that, but don't forget we did produce a Dell, a National Instruments, and a Whole Foods.

As Cotter explained at Longhorn Startup, as well as when I interviewed him as part of my Entrepreneur-in-Residence Speaker Series at the McCombs School of Business Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship, his entrepreneurial journey at age 46 started out with the euphoria of being his own CEO followed by a gut-wrenching pivot. Cotter bucks the flavor-of-the-day entrepreneurial stereotype: the college dropout popularized by both our own Michael Dell and recently Mark Zuckerberg and the great movie The Social Network. Michael and Mark are business savants, just like Michelangelo was an art and engineering savant (by the way, I'm pretty sure Michelangelo would have made a damn good entrepreneur in this day and age). Most of us simply aren't savants. I don't consider myself one - I didn't start my first business until I was 24 and earning my MBA and I didn't hit on something big enough to drop out of my MBA so I proudly finished and then chose Coremetrics. Cotter's first company was called Divorce360.com and you can see him quoted as their CEO here. After more than a year, it was a miserable failure. And the funny (and fortunate) thing is - Cotter has never been divorced! Instead of crying in their beers about it, Cotter and Tom Ball at Austin Ventures decided what to do next and came up with Small Ponds, which later became Whale Shark Media and then RetailMeNot (named after it's largest digital property). No matter the name - the business was the same and through acquisitions it became to be worth $1.33 billion as the juggernaut it is today. Here it is in Cotter's own words:

The line between success and failure is sometimes very thin indeed, and that is the subject of this blog post. To be very upfront, my goal is to help Austin entrepreneurs shrug off failure more easily - after accounting for the important lessons learned - and just "keep walking".

Keep Walking

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